Steel Standing Book

Muscle Disease from Metal Implants

Posts Tagged ‘Skin Patch Testing’

Total Joint Replacement: What to ask?

Tuesday, November 5th, 2013 | Health Care In General, Inflammatory Myopathy, Types of Metals | No Comments

The following hyperlink will carry you to an AAOS site with good questions. http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00375

But there are some questions missing you might want to include in your list.

Does or did your orthopedic surgeon or dentist ask if you were allergic to metal, any types of metals? Known what metals are being placed in your body. This web site is constantly getting emails from those who already have metal implants, relate to the symptom as shared with my mother’s case, then recognize they are experiencing the same. ONLY then does it seem a patient will listen or ask question before allowing any type of metal placed in their body.

Please note: Not everyone is sensitive to metals! But what if you are one of the ones that are sensitive to Nickel? Cobalt? Chromium in metal implants should be marked off everyone’s list! It causes renal and digestive failure EVEN if you are NOT allergic to Chromium. Google the facts!

Patch testing is being referred to a great deal lately as shared by many of our followers. It seems most orthopedic surgeons are advising their patients to have a patch test which is a skin test with metals placed on your body for three days. Then if there are any red marks where the metal piece was placed, the dermatologists declares you have a metal allergy to that type of metal.

How is it possible for a skin/patch test to be more accurate than a blood test that will capture the blood culture which circulates where the metal implants are located?

It baffles me to hear orthopedic surgeons and dermatologists claiming patch testing is the end all, answer all to detecting metal allergies!

I’m not a clinician, but I witnessed my mother’s patch test, which her dermatologist allowed. Her patch test was too vague. That’s when we were referred to a MELISA blood allergy test. I saw the results from her MELISA test! It was definitive and clear cut. There was not any reason to doubt her blood allergy test results from an appropriate lab that is credible.

When a patient is told a blood allergy test is not credible, ask your doctor check his/her sources. Share the web site of that lab! Become educated and informed.

With all due respect, medical doctors appear leery of metal allergy blood testing. Why, I have to wonder. Is there a hidden agenda or is it because patients are complaining to doctors that are missing the connection to unrelated health issues caused by metal implants creating failed health over sometimes “a gradual amount of time” and others quickly discover failing health which directs links back to when the metal implant was surgically placed in the body.

It’s your body. It’s your health. Respect your doctors. However, don’t be afraid to get additional opinions. Do your homework!

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Metal “Allergies” – Nothing to Sneeze About

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2013 | Inflammatory Myopathy, Types of Metals | No Comments

When thinking of allergies, most are likely to think of skin allergies, seasonal changes due to plants or allergic reactions to animals. However, few people probably think of one of the most serious allergies known to man’s existence; metal allergies.

“Do you know the types of metals in your implants?”

It’s a question asked among the attendees at “Steel Standing” presentations. Most shrug their shoulders, unaware of the potential dangers lurking beneath their skin and muscle tissue if they’ve had metal implants such as joint replacements, pacemaker (outside casing), or have had dental implants with “alloy” posts. There is a huge difference between “alloy” metals and “pure” metals.

The microscopic metallic ions from the metals in joint replacements or other types of metal implants, attach themselves to the weakest area of an individual’s anatomy.  For example; metal allergies ignite “another” unrelated health issue appearing to be “unassociated” to the origin –  which is the “types” of metals used in the metal implant. Nickel allergies are high among the general population, but there are other metal allergies most may not think about.

There is a unique blood allergy test which will determine the types of metals offered on today’s orthopaedic market that an individual is allergic to.  Check your sources and be aware of what your options are when searching for a reliable lab. 

Gesundheit!

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Re: Metal on Metal Warning

Saturday, March 16th, 2013 | Inflammatory Myopathy, Types of Metals | No Comments

In my efforts to share views, news and perspective primarily related to metal implants, it’s not too often I discover which articles offer encouragement. The highlighted article in this weblog, “Re: Metal on Metal Warning” was a welcomed discovery from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (www.aaos.org) spokesperson, Joshua J. Jacobs, MD, posted on BoneSmart.org

Previously metal replacements resulting in questionable medical cases with hip replacements, were lumped into one category. The following information should offer anyone affected by similar experiences, hope! Orthopaedic surgeons are starting to publicly recognize what’s happening with metal implants and muscle tissue damage.

One of the orthopaedic surgeons largest associations is now specifically referring to two different types of cases. A progressive move for defining metal hip replacement issues.

Also, Joshua J. Jacobs, MD, suggested, as quoted:

“In patients with metal-on-metal surface replacements, there is a direct correlation between serum metal levels and metal sensitivity determined by [lymphocyte transformation testing] LTT,” Jacobs said. “Current diagnostic methods, both patch testing and in vitro, do require more robust clinical validation, but it can be useful in pre-op screening for patients with in vitro metal allergies when there is a history of reaction to jewelry.”

The article also states:

“Based on case reports and device literature, Jacobs said that metal allergy exists and has been seen as a temporal association. It can have different presentations and many involve a rash. In some examples, patients suffer skin reactions after implantation of total joint replacement devices. In other cases, the reaction goes away after the implant is removed for nonunion or re-fracture, only to return after re-implantation. In my mind, those sorts of cases prove to me that this is a real clinical entity,” Jacobs said.

Using patch testing, 14% of the general population would be sensitive to nickel and 10% would be sensitive to cobalt and chromium. However, Jacob said that patch testing may be flawed because it may have no bearing on what is occurring happening in deep tissues.

“Metal-on-metal allergy is the cause of clinical symptomatology, such as pain and swelling,” Jacobs said. These allergies present as skin reactions such as dermatitis, or patients may have a history of allergy to jewelry. The responses to these allergies can present as stiff knees, pseudotumors, necrosis or unexplained pain,” Jacobs said.

CCD: The deep tissue issue is how the medical breakthrough, as depicted in “Steel Standing,” has successfully enlightened neurologists to review other muscle disease/disorder cases in patients with metal implants. Also, my mother used M.E.L.I.S.A. metal allergy testing vs. LTT.  For more information, to have a M.E.L.I.S.A. allergy test in the United States contact: info@neurorelief.com

Reference:
Jacobs JJ. Clinical manifestations of metal allergy. Adverse reactions to byproducts of joint replacements (AAOS/ORSI). Presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery 2012 Annual Meeting. Feb. 7-11. San Francisco.

To read the complete article: http://bonesmart.org/forum/threads/metal-allergy-in-joint-replacement.13261/

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