Steel Standing Book

Muscle Disease from Metal Implants

Posts Tagged ‘clinical’

Out the ROOF Allergy to Nickel Results!

Friday, November 22nd, 2013 | Health Care In General, Inflammatory Myopathy, Types of Metals | No Comments

Where can a patient turn to when in need of a revision or a removal, due to potential metal allergies from: knee replacement; hip replacement; metal plate and screws; dental posts; rods used in spines; surgical clips; pacemakers; and many other metal implants? To find an answer is a daunting task!

NOT EVERYONE IS ALLERGIC TO THEIR METAL IMPLANTS.

But what about those that are?!?

Based the feedback from so many patients, we find appalling how many people are suffering from metal implants. I began writing Steel Standing to share my mom’s story as we learned her health troubles were stemming from her metal joint replacements. It became a mystery flipped to a medical breakthrough!

Soon, a web site was needed to help promote the book, share our ongoing presentations and now we are advocating for others in need.

Patient’s Doctor Dismisses Metal Allergy Testing Results!

A patient named Tina has a metal rod made from alloys such as Cobalt-Chromium-Nickel which was surgically attached to her spine. She lives in Utah and has not been successful in her many attempts to get a medical doctor of any specialty to listen to her ailments. 

Tina shared with me, ”The doctors are all at a loss. When I accidentally discovered your web site while searching for any clues what might be wrong with me, I realized after reading your mom’s story my health problems may be to be metal related. There is nothing else that could be causing so much pain and weakness with extreme fatigue.  What’s more important is that I did not have any of these crazy symptoms until after the metal rod was placed in my spine. It has gradually decreased my health. I’m only 37 years old.”

Tina contacted me through our web site seeking my advise based on being my mom’s experience and discovering a wealth of metal information regarding metal inserts/implants in the United Kingdom. She has repeatedly met with her orthopedic surgeon, begging for him to remove the rod since she said it is no longer needed. The orthopaedic surgeon continues to refuse to listen to her. Tina has also been unsuccessful to get another orthopaedic surgeon that specializes in spinal rods since the doctors in her area belong to the same medical network.

Her next decision was to have a M.E.L.I.S.A. blood allergy test to see if any of the types of metals in her rod could be causing an allergic reaction. Her report was shocking! I could not believe her orthopaedic surgeon did not attempt to help his patient when he saw the M.E.L.I.S.A. report! Nickel (as shown below) is “off the charts” at 13.7 in addition to other mild metal allergies.

 Tina's MELISA Test Illustration

 (Click on photo for larger view)

Now, look at Mom’s M.E.L.I.S.A. Report.

 PDH MELISA REPORT FOR WEB

 (Click on photo for larger view)

Tina’s Nickel Allergy Results: 13.7 

Mom’s Nickel Allergy Results: 3.1

In reviewing the chart/timeline I created below to illustrate my mom’s journey with Cobalt-Chromium-Nickel with Nickel being one of the HIGHEST of her metal allergies. It is amazing my mom survived with only 3.1 positive.

 Steel Standing Graph

 (Click on photo for larger view)

This was story was first shared on November 10, 2013.

This blog post was updated on November 22, 2013.

Nothing has been done due to health insurance conflicts.

-Christa, Author of Steel Standing

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FDA Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee Meeting Announcement

Sunday, November 10th, 2013 | Uncategorized | No Comments

FDA STILL DOESN’T GET IT! “TYPES OF METALS” is the correct answer!

(This is part of the long FDA announcement and meeting notes.)

Agenda: On December 12, 2013, during Session I, the committee will discuss and make reco…mmendations regarding the classification of spinal sphere devices. These devices are spheres manufactured from metallic (e.g., cobalt chromium molybdenum) or polymeric (e.g., polyetheretherketone) materials. They are intended to be inserted between the vertebral bodies into the disc space from L3-S1 to help provide stabilization and to help promote intervertebral body fusion. During the arthrodesis procedure, they are to be used with bone graft. These devices are not intended for use in motion-sparing, non-fusion procedures.

PLEASE NOTE the types of metals they are going to “suggest (dictate?)” for orthopaedic surgeons to place in the spine!

“Cobalt, Chromium and Molybdenum”

Chromium and Molybdenum are only 1 element away from being twins! That means double the trouble for metal inserts, especially in the spine area! Those types of metals almost destroyed my mom’s kidneys. Beware of what types of metals are placed in your body.

Chromium causes renal and digestive failure. Google it! Learn and share, please! The photo below is my mom’s left hip after her third revision with repeated metals of Cobalt-Chromium-Nickel.

Also, note: Approximately 30 percent (varies with dermatologists) of the general population are allergic to Nickel.

WHY USE Cobalt, Chromium and Molybdenum metals? Because ortho mfgs can make a boat load of money on inexpensive hardware that is an alloy and not pure! Guess that’s how they make their billions.

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Questions to Ask Your Medical Provider

Thursday, September 12th, 2013 | Health Care In General, Types of Metals | No Comments

 

Be prepared before your next physician visit. Ask questions. Learn more about your health and your habits to better communicate with your medical provider!Web Site Ask Questions Clip Art copy

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) provides the following list of 10 important questions to ask your medical provider.

 

 

 

 

 

    1. What is the test for?
    2. How many times have you done this?
    3. When will I get the results?
    4. Why do I need this surgery? (IF this is a metal implant, ask what types of metals will be used and request a metal allergy test.  An LTT or MELISA  lab tests are the ONLY tests widely known to test for ALL types of metals surgically used in today’s market.)
    5. Are there any alternatives to surgery?
    6. What are the possible complications?
    7. Which hospital is best for my needs?
    8. How do you spell the name of that drug?
    9. Are there any side effects?
    10. Will this medicine interact with medicines that I’m already taking?

Source: Baylor Health Care System, www.baylorhealth.com

 

 

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Serum Chromium Levels After Stainless Steel

Wednesday, June 5th, 2013 | Types of Metals | No Comments

“Predictors of serum chromium levels after stainless steel posterior spinal instrumentation for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis”

ARTICLE LINK: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20375769

RESULTS: Implant exposure, whether expressed in the form of total metal implant surface area, rod length, or number of metal interfaces, was found to be positively associated with serum chromium levels.

CONCLUSION: After adjusting for the number of years since surgery, metal implant exposure is positively associated with elevated serum chromium levels in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients with stainless steel posterior spinal implants.

SOURCES:

Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2010 Apr 20;35(9):975-82. doi: 10.1097/BRS.0b013e3181d7a197
Rackham MD, Cundy TP, Antoniou G, Freeman BJ, Sutherland LM, Cundy PJ.
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Women’s and Children’s Hospital, University of Adelaide, 72 King William Road, North Adelaide, SA 5006, Australia.

CCD NOTES: Chromium causes renal and digestive failure even if you are not allergic to Chromium, or any levels of Chromium are reported in your lab work or metal allergy tests. So why would any one manufacture metal implants to be placed in the body if  that substance had a tendency to be knowingly harmful? Hmm.

There is an abundance of Chromium in the earth. I believe the law of supply and demand would adequately reveal the answer.

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Re: Metal on Metal Warning

Saturday, March 16th, 2013 | Inflammatory Myopathy, Types of Metals | No Comments

In my efforts to share views, news and perspective primarily related to metal implants, it’s not too often I discover which articles offer encouragement. The highlighted article in this weblog, “Re: Metal on Metal Warning” was a welcomed discovery from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (www.aaos.org) spokesperson, Joshua J. Jacobs, MD, posted on BoneSmart.org

Previously metal replacements resulting in questionable medical cases with hip replacements, were lumped into one category. The following information should offer anyone affected by similar experiences, hope! Orthopaedic surgeons are starting to publicly recognize what’s happening with metal implants and muscle tissue damage.

One of the orthopaedic surgeons largest associations is now specifically referring to two different types of cases. A progressive move for defining metal hip replacement issues.

Also, Joshua J. Jacobs, MD, suggested, as quoted:

“In patients with metal-on-metal surface replacements, there is a direct correlation between serum metal levels and metal sensitivity determined by [lymphocyte transformation testing] LTT,” Jacobs said. “Current diagnostic methods, both patch testing and in vitro, do require more robust clinical validation, but it can be useful in pre-op screening for patients with in vitro metal allergies when there is a history of reaction to jewelry.”

The article also states:

“Based on case reports and device literature, Jacobs said that metal allergy exists and has been seen as a temporal association. It can have different presentations and many involve a rash. In some examples, patients suffer skin reactions after implantation of total joint replacement devices. In other cases, the reaction goes away after the implant is removed for nonunion or re-fracture, only to return after re-implantation. In my mind, those sorts of cases prove to me that this is a real clinical entity,” Jacobs said.

Using patch testing, 14% of the general population would be sensitive to nickel and 10% would be sensitive to cobalt and chromium. However, Jacob said that patch testing may be flawed because it may have no bearing on what is occurring happening in deep tissues.

“Metal-on-metal allergy is the cause of clinical symptomatology, such as pain and swelling,” Jacobs said. These allergies present as skin reactions such as dermatitis, or patients may have a history of allergy to jewelry. The responses to these allergies can present as stiff knees, pseudotumors, necrosis or unexplained pain,” Jacobs said.

CCD: The deep tissue issue is how the medical breakthrough, as depicted in “Steel Standing,” has successfully enlightened neurologists to review other muscle disease/disorder cases in patients with metal implants. Also, my mother used M.E.L.I.S.A. metal allergy testing vs. LTT.  For more information, to have a M.E.L.I.S.A. allergy test in the United States contact: info@neurorelief.com

Reference:
Jacobs JJ. Clinical manifestations of metal allergy. Adverse reactions to byproducts of joint replacements (AAOS/ORSI). Presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery 2012 Annual Meeting. Feb. 7-11. San Francisco.

To read the complete article: http://bonesmart.org/forum/threads/metal-allergy-in-joint-replacement.13261/

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Atlanta FOX News Interview

Sunday, April 8th, 2012 | Inflammatory Myopathy, Types of Metals | No Comments

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